mychoice® - Greektown Casino-Hotel

A STADIUM'S WALKABILITY: Using Google Maps, I look at each stadium's walkability and locale

Walkability is something that's important to a stadium. There has to be activity around the stadium for fans to do before and after games. A few stadiums have excellent walkability, while others are terrible. I'll analyze each stadium using Google Maps, as I haven't been to many of these places, and I'd appreciate input from you guys about other things from each stadium that add to the walkability of a stadium.
If anyone has anything to add or correct, please comment. Thank you!
submitted by project305 to hockey [link] [comments]

Visitor's Guide to Red Wings hockey at Little Caesers Arena

It’s the inaugural season of the new Little Caesers Arena (LCA). Many pilgrims are making the trek to the new arena to watch the Detroit Red Wings play. This is my first version of this guide for first time visitors modeled after the one I put together for The Joe. I hope you find it helpful. Suggestions welcome!
Edit 1: typos and ride share info
Edit 2: photo spot location and photo
submitted by spoonyfork to DetroitRedWings [link] [comments]

Alternate History: Woodward gets his Way, An Essay on the Woodward Plan and what Detroit would be Like had the Plan been Implemented.

Leading Picture
https://i.imgur.com/tBFvwfh.jpg
Setting the Scene:
The year is 1805. Detroit has a population of about 1000 people and has only been a part of the United States for two years. Alas, it doesn't take long for things to go horribly wrong, as the entire city burns down this year. Judge Augustus Woodward, the first Judge of the Michigan Territory, creates an ambitious and unique plan to rebuild it.
Summary of what follows:
Ultimately, for various reasons, only a small fraction of Judge Woodward's grand plan was actually implemented. My goal is to attempt to see what Detroit would be like had the Woodward plan been fully carried out, as well as educate about the details of the plan and its history.
If you're just here for the pictures, here is a link to the complete album:
https://imgur.com/a/y5hLS
If you're still with me, without further ado, let's get started.
What was Woodward's plan?
I think it is best to show it in terms of what would change about Detroit as we know it, step by step:
https://imgur.com/a/LjTL1
Key Points of the Woodward Plan
This is nuts, how much of this was actually built?
I've highlighted the buildings that exist in the city today according to the following scheme:
First, here's the buildings on top of the existing street layout:
https://imgur.com/P2uQaD3
Now, replace that street layout with Woodward's:
https://imgur.com/JRYkclz
Finally, destroy the nonconforming buildings and replace them with conforming buildings:
https://imgur.com/ZOokpeJ
This plan seems crazy, where did Woodward get the idea from?
He was impressed and inspired by Washington D.C. and its diagonal avenues, but Woodward's plan takes it a step further. While Washington D.C. is simply a system of rectangular lots that happens to have diagonal avenues in it, the Woodward plan is a modular system entirely based on triangles that could be added as the city expanded.
Are you saying the spoke roads are not a part of the Woodward Plan?
Yes, this is a common misconception. The only relationship the spoke roads have to the Woodward plan is that they take roads that are part of the Woodward plan and extend them straight for ~40 miles.
Why was so little of the plan implemented?
Firstly, Woodward had limited authority to break up land that was already owned. For example, the government owned the area between Michigan Ave and Jefferson Ave and chose to arrange it in a conventional grid. Additionally, land in parcels perpendicular to the river owned by individuals, like the Brush family and the Beaubien family, could not be broken up and incorporated into the plan.
Secondly, drafting up a city plan takes time and the people of Detroit grew restless as time passed after the devastating fire. The public also disliked the idea of so much public park space. Coupled with a general resistance for change, emnity toward Woodward's plan grew, so much so that others in Michigan's government would try to undo it while he was away. On one such occurrence, Woodward's detractors authorized the land north of Grand Circus park to be sold in rectangular parcels. Despite Woodward's alarm and protests that such a maneuver was illegal, the sale went through in 1817. This killed hope of implementing any more of the Woodward Plan. Part of Woodward's written complaint was as follows: “Nature had destined the city of Detroit to be a great interior emporium, equal, if not superior, to any other on the surface of the … globe. … In such a case that art of man should aid the benevolence of the Creator, and no restricted attachment to the present day or to present interests should induce a permanent sacrifice of ulterior and brilliant prospects.”
And with that, Detroit's chance to develop as a truly one-of-a-kind city passed. The question of "what if" has reigned unchallenged ever since. Until now, that is. Working from Judge Woodward's original plans, I built the city street by street and building by building in Sketchup, creating "Woodward Detroit". I've included some famous Detroit buildings in Woodward Detroit, most of the rest are "filler" buildings meant to give the impression of a complete city. Now, I give you Detroit built per Woodward's own specifications.
Some Aerial Photos and the Skyline
https://imgur.com/tBFvwfh https://imgur.com/Yn4TJyc https://imgur.com/sVuvYse
Transit in Woodward Detroit
I see a lot of discussion around the subreddit about Detroit's transit woes so I did some thinking about transit, both from the present Detroit perspective of auto-dominance and an alternate rail and subway perspective.
Roads
Woodward could not have foreseen the explosive growth Detroit would see, eventually growing to a city of two million. I beilieve it is remarkable that he included 120' and 200' roads when designing the city in 1805; he showed remarkable foresight there that would lend itself well to Detroit's development as Motor City. However, I believe a limitation would show itself in the circle parks. Twelve roads all come together and you're stuck in a giant traffic circle. That sounds like a traffic nighmare.
On an interesting side note, there is nothing special about Woodward Avenue in Woodward Detroit. It isn't even a grand avenue. In present Detroit after the Woodward plan was defeated, people came along afterward and extended Fort, Michigan, Grand River, Woodward, Gratiot, and Jefferson into the "spokes" we know today. Ironically, the defeat of the Woodward Plan allowed Woodward to become a household name by having his name attached to the major thoroughfare of M-1.
While I have depicted the medians in the grand avenues as solid, there is no reason they couldn't be crossed with streets as they are presently on Washington Blvd, for example.
The layout of one way streets in the small Woodward portion of present Detroit gives a clue what the layout in Woodward Detroit could be like. The circle park road is one way, like a giant roundabout, then the outer concentric circular roads are also one way in alternating directions.
https://imgur.com/1dB9WLT
Writing my own fantasy history, we'll say that the parks contributed to traffic in Woodward Detroit becoming the worst in the country by the 1950s. Citizens of Woodward Detroit unified in such an uproar at the idea running highways through their unique city that the city was forced to look at more efficient ways of moving people...
Rail / Subway
The 200' wide grand avenues leave ample room for light rail in the medians, one track each way. However, unlike in present Detroit, where roads run dozens of miles without interruption, the grand avenues of Woodward Detroit are full of parks. One possible course of action is to use the Campus Martius style parks as stations and the Circle parks as interchanges for the trains.
https://imgur.com/WDPDvAz
A second option is more familiar: spokes. These lines could be on the surface or a subway system, but I call them "the subway" in the rest of the post, so we'll go with that. I like this spoke option because it solidifies Grand Circus park as the center of the city, with subway lines stretching out to the suburbs in a similar fashion to the spoke roads today. I don't know what the Grand Circus park station would look like, with the logistics of six subway lines all intersecting there, but I'm sure the result would be a marvel of the transit world. I chose to leave it to the imagination and have them all mash together, beacuse such a station is beyond my skill to create.
https://imgur.com/lCh1UWQ
Thirdly, the "why not both?" option ensures ample transit coverage.
https://imgur.com/sd5R4Z6
Now, with all of these lines, subways, and stations, it seems we need some way to move people around between them. Hence, the People Mover takes its place in Woodward Detroit. The People Mover can finally serve its intended purpose of moving people between different transit lines.
https://imgur.com/51MRHuq
Both sets of rail and the people mover create a robust transit system.
https://imgur.com/27WzjJ9
Looking at specific famous Detroit buildings / locations
Renaissance Center Since the unique part of the Woodward plan applies to only above Jefferson Ave, the Renaissance Center can stay exactly where it is in present Detroit.
https://imgur.com/VpLTfFZ
One Detroit Center, One Woodward Ave, McKinsey, Crowne Plaza
https://imgur.com/F4G5vis
Penobscot Building, Guardian Building, 211 Fort St.
https://imgur.com/OtgdTft
Campus Martius, First National Building, One Campus Martius, One Kennedy Square The first two buildings conform to the Woodward plan, One Kennedy Square was reshaped.
https://imgur.com/lXWFtS7
Monroe Block, First National, Cadillac Tower, Cadillac Square Cadillac Square is not a square any longer; instead it is just a part of Michigan Grand Ave. I've included a concept for the upcoming development on the Monroe block.
https://imgur.com/VoGyaiV
Hudson's Site Based upon the latest renderings, though the tower of apartments is more inspired by the first rendering. Standing 800' tall to its roof, this new skycraper is a focal point for present Detroit and Woodward Detroit alike.
https://imgur.com/z6NuGkB
View from top of David Whitney Building
https://imgur.com/9D9HaWA
Book Skyscraper In my made up history, the Woodward plan allowed Detroit's boom and surge to reach even greater heights before the Depression, enabling the construction of grand plans that were shelved in present Detroit because of the Depression. One such building is the 82 Story Book skyscraper attached to the Book Tower we know and love, standing about 900' tall!
https://imgur.com/27v3W27
Grand Circus Park Grand Circus Park would be quite a sight, to be standing in the center of the full circle with all twelve lots occupied by towers (though I didn't have the heart to remove the eternal parking lot at Adams and Madison (apparently now called Aretha Franklin Way)). In this alternate history, it is the transit hub of Detroit, served by six subway lines and the People Mover.
https://imgur.com/6hCgcTL
Water Board Building
https://imgur.com/VOHe101
Detroit Library
https://imgur.com/cssXTnA
Michigan Central Station
https://imgur.com/ntN6jHM https://imgur.com/MPXMKgi
Greektown / Casino
https://imgur.com/hQICX6D
Fisher Building
Another Detroit building that was prevented from reaching its full potential by the Depression. The Fisher Building we know today is less than a third of the original plan. You can read more about that in my post here: https://www.reddit.com/Detroit/comments/5vu97d/alternate_history_the_fisher_building_is_finished/?st=j89fj0h5&sh=928a4c31
In my alternate history, the Fisher brothers, seeking to cement their legacy with the largest commercial building in the world, finally convinced the city to allow the construction of their tower inside a circle park, ensuring that it is visible as the terminating vista on 12 streets. The Albert Kahn firm spared no expense and created a lavish limestone 60 story tower flanked by two 30 story towers, crowned by gold leaf roofs and all joined together by a U shaped, three-story lobby filled with decadent gold leaf, bronze, frescos, and murals. Finished just months before the 1929 Great Depression, it stands as a nationally-recognized high point of Art Deco architecture.
https://imgur.com/Bk17fXV
(Aside: How tall is it? There is a problem with the scale of the Fisher Building model. The width is correct at 800' and the footprint actually does just barely fit inside a circle park. However, the roof height (not including spire) of the 30 story part is 301' in the model while the actual roof height is 418.3'. Applying this scale factor would put the actual height of the 60 story roof at 938.3'.)
Riverfront Towers, Cobo, Joe Louis
https://imgur.com/v0WPDBn
Comerica Park and Ford Field
I experimented to see if these stadiums could fit inside circle parks.
https://imgur.com/AtGJUJR
https://imgur.com/g1n75ZF
Views
Aerial Views and Views from the tops of buildings
https://imgur.com/QyRFaqZ https://imgur.com/UE4TfN1 https://imgur.com/LpIYRNT https://imgur.com/NtHsBd8 https://imgur.com/U6D40h0 https://imgur.com/DhQs0Yl https://imgur.com/v7V2uz4 https://imgur.com/Wf6gOjm
Matched Photo
I attempted to match an aerial photo I found https://imgur.com/N7tf2lR http://banana1015.com/files/2016/03/Spencer-Platt-Getty-Images.jpg
Bonus
Woodward Detroit's one-of-a-kind layout has created a close knit city with an atmosphere like no other, with world leading architecture, innovation, and a robust transit system. Naturally, a certain tech company looking for their second HQ chose it as their first choice, claiming "there weren't ever really any other options." I had some fun making a circle park and its surrounding buildings into one unified HQ complex. And it does lie on one of the subway lines.
https://imgur.com/3lY5Rtn
Conclusion & Sources
For further reading about the history of the Woodward plan, I recommend this excellent three part article, from which I sourced much of my information:
http://detroiturbanism.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-woodward-plan-part-i-origins.html
Some information also came from here, a shorter summary focusing on the plan's downfall:
https://www.metrotimes.com/news-hits/archives/2015/06/01/the-detroit-that-never-was-how-the-woodward-plan-died-197-years-ago
In conclusion, once I learned about Woodward and his grand plan for Detroit, I voraciously devoured any information I could find about it. The combination of its true uniqueness among urban designs and the fact that just enough of the plan was built to stimulte curiousity but not enough to indicate what the whole city would look like sent me on this path. My goal was to create what Woodward could not and provide an alternate vision for what Detroit could have been. I greatly enjoyed following Woodward's own procedure to lay out a section and then populating with all the buildings and details. I am very pleased with the final results and hope you are too. I undertook this project out of passion and interest. I hope you enjoyed reading and that I arranged the content in a clear manner. Thanks for reading!
Acknowledgements
A wonderful tool in Sketchup is the ability to import models created by others. I used this to build more of a connection from my virtual Woodward Detroit to the Detroit we know today and I feel the results of my project would not have been even half as good without them. A big thank you to the following Sketchup users:
Also thank you to this reddit post; which fueled my inspiration for this project: https://www.reddit.com/MapPorn/comments/14qgyc/oc_my_map_of_the_1807_woodward_plan_for_the/?st=j89i5z1x&sh=62676319
submitted by mr_hemi to Detroit [link] [comments]

Updated List of things to Do - 2018 Edition

Happy New Year /Detroit! Every day people come to ask "What should I do in the city??" and this updated thread is our chance to tell them. It's been 3+ years since its been updated so a lot has changed. Keeping a similar format to the 2014 and 2011 editions comment below with any suggestion(s) and a short reason why you recommend it.
Everyone's collective picks will be added into the list below and then added to the sidebar. Closed businesses have already been removed, new Museums section now broken out, if you have any adds/deletes/edits to existing list, just shout it out, I'll leave this post as a sticky and open over the next week so all have a chance to contribute. See below:

Entertainment & Attractions

Public Spaces/Parks:
Entertainment Venues:
Seasonal:
Other:

Museums & Exhibits

  • Detroit Institute of Arts Free for Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb county residents.
  • Motown Museum the birthplace of Motown music, located in New Center
  • Henry Ford Museum/Greenfield Village Good for vistors if they have a few hours and transportation.
  • MOCAD Contemporary Art Museum in an amazing raw space, always changing exhibitions and a nice little shop inside. Located on Woodward in Midtown.
  • Michigan Science Center hands-on exhibits, IMAX Dome, Planetarium, mad scientists with liquid nitrogen and lightning. good for kids, located in Midtown.
  • Outdoor Adventure Center located in the newly restored Globe Trading Building.
  • Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History
  • Tuskegee Airmen Museum
  • African Bead Museum
  • Dossin Great Lakes Museum located on Belle Isle
  • Ford Piquette Plant historic auto production facility and birthplace of the Model T.

Retail & Shopping

  • John K. King Books Downtown; Largest used bookstore in the state, located in an old glove warehouse
  • Pewabic Pottery near Islandview; Detroit original, lots of original ceramic art work to view and purchase
  • Third Man Records Retail store and Vinyl Manufacturing plant, owned/operated by Jack White
  • City Bird Midtown; Handmade goods from local and regional designers
  • People's Records Gratiot in Eastern Market; Internationally renowned treasure trove of rare vinyl, with a focus on Detroit produced stuff
  • Hello Records Corktown; Newer record shop with a great collection of new and old vinyl
  • Pure Detroit Downtown and New Center; Detroit themed t-shirts, magnets, etc.
  • Shinola Flagship Store watches, bikes and leather goods.
  • The Hub A Bicycle shop with a charitable bent and affordable bikes.
  • Avenue of Fashion Located at Livernois and Outer Drive; shopping district off the beaten path
  • Run Detroit Running gear store in Midtown, hosts a welcoming run club every Saturday morning at 8am
  • Paramita Sound Record store in West Village

Places to eat:

  • Coney Islands Lafayette or American, take your pick. Duly's Place in Mexicantown as another OG contender.
  • Supino Pizzeria Eastern Market; Best NY style pizza in the city, delicious fresh ingredients
  • Cass Cafe Restaurant and art gallery in Cass Corridor.
  • Green Dot Stables Grab your saddle, best sliders in the city.
  • Johnny Noodle King one of Detroit's ramen noodle houses
  • The Bronx Midtown. Classic dive bar with an equally classic jukebox and a burger that's out of this world.
  • Sweetwater Tavern Downtown, /Detroit's pick for 'Best Wings in the City'
  • Buddy's Pizza Original Detroit style pizza, well regarded by foodies and chefs.
  • Rock City Eatery on Woodward in Midtown. Cheap drinks and great food.
  • Dutch Girl Donuts Palmer Park. Best donuts in the city, been doing it the same way forever.
  • Mudgies Deli Corktown fresh sandwich shop with patio, recently expanded.
  • Cadieux Cafe Jazz music throughout the week and authentic Featherbowling.
  • Slow's BBQ Corktown. BBQ that put Corktown as a food destination on the map. Check out Slows-To-Go in Midtown if you're looking to skip the wait.
  • The Food Exchange famous for the Big Baby burger
  • Vincente's Great Cuban food. Salsa dancing. 20+ types of tequila
  • Ottava Via Italian joint in Corktown. Great food, laid back atmosphere.
  • Mercury Bar Good food and beer selection and the atmosphere is really cool.
  • Townhouse located Downtown
  • Bucharest Grill Amazing Shawarma and good prices, 3 locations around the city.
  • Scotty Simpson's Northwest side for fish and chips
  • Polish Village Cafe Eat your Polish Grandmother's cooking. A Hamtramck staple.
  • The Whitney Restaurant in a gorgeous historic mansion. Ambience is spectacular, food has gone through down periods. Good spot for an important date night. Don't be surprised to see a marriage proposal.
  • Giovanni's Arguably the best Italian food in the city. Neighborhood is what happens when you zone Heavy Industrial in Sim City, but the food, service and ambience are world-class.
  • London Chop House A famous Detroit restaurant name brought back to life, it's a classic dark-wood, old-school steakhouse. Frank Sinatra and Henry Ford II had tables there. Just opened a cigar bar in the same building for after-dinner lounging.
  • Roast "Iron Chef" Michael Symon's restaurant in the Westin Book Cadillac hotel. Things happen to meat here that you never thought possible.
  • Joe Muer's Seafood Like the London Chop House, a classic name from Detroit restaurant history brought back to life. Located in the ground floor of the GM Renaissance Center, lunch is comprised almost entirely of GM suppliers taking their customers out to lunch, but dinner is another matter.
  • Golden Fleece Greektown. "Best Gyro in town" and other greek specialties.
  • Mexicantown Most authentic Mexican food in the city, can't go wrong: Los Altos, Taqueria Lupitas, Taqueria Nuestra Familia, Taqueria El Rey, or Taqueria Mi Pueblo.
  • ** Takoi** Northern Thai inspired restaurant. James Beard finalist
  • Selden Standard Fine dining, local, small plates. Also great brunch.
  • Wright & Co Fine dining, local, small plates.
  • Republic Fine dining, local, small plates.
  • ima Corktown, Udon noodles.
  • Flower's of Vietnam Vietnamese restaurant run by a Lebanese chef in an old Mexicantown coney. Only in Detroit.
  • Polonia Restaurant Home style Polish and Eastern European food, located right next to Polish Village cafe in Hamtramck.
  • Apparatus Room Fine restaurant & bar in the Detroit Foundation Hotel near Cobo Center.
  • People's Bakery One of Southwest's finest local shops.

Brunch Spots

  • Cliff Bells Foxtown. Bottomless mimosas and bloody Mary's and great selection of French and Soul Food inspired dishes
  • Hudson Cafe Downtown. Red velvet pancakes, graham cracker-crusted French toast, and Voodoo Eggs Benedict
  • Seva Midtown. great Brunch for Vegan's and Vegetarian's- Small but good beewine selection
  • Brooklyn Street Local Corktown. banana pancakes with caramelized walnuts, an inevitably delicious quiche-of-the-day, and of course, the Hangover Special, and some damn good Poutine!
  • La Dolce Vita North Detroit. smooth jazz, salmon hash, and the shrimp Benedict make for a fabulous brunch experience
  • The Dime Store Downtown. a great selection of Omelets, Benedicts, Sandwiches, and Hash (from Executive Chef Josh, who has spent 2 decades in award winning restaraunts in Chicago, NYC, and A2) and of course, BOOZE! (Their Duck Rueben is out of this world)
  • Foran's Grand Trunk Pub Downtown. Great meal options throughout the day but their brunch is great (May I recommend their Corktown sandwich or the Lobster Benedict) with a great local beer selection to boot
  • Rose's Fine Foods Rivertown. Homesick for mom's cooking? This place has incredible baked goods and delicious sandwiches that make you feel right at home
  • The Clique Breakfast spot on Jefferson in Rivertown area
  • Honest Johns Midtown. Good all around menu, drink list and Chicken & Waffles.
  • Detroit Institute of Bagels Traditional bagels plus soups & sandwiches in an airy, industrial space with counter seating.

Places to drink:

Breweries:
  • Batch Brewing Co. Corktown small batch brewery with 15+ beers on tap and Louisiana-style food.
  • Detroit Beer Co. Great beer as well as great food. The Hair of the Dog burger is fantastic.
  • Atwater Detroit brewery near the Riverfront
  • Brew Detroit Contract brewing facility with a great open space and their own brews. Across the park from Batch. The Loaded Die hosts Tuesday boardgame nights here.
  • Eastern Market Brewing Company The large pink elephant mural is hard to miss.
  • Founders taproom Needs no introduction
  • Motor City Brewing Works Midtown; Microbrewery with delicious beer and uniquely-topped pizzas, rooftop seating in the Summer
  • Jolly Pumpkin Brewery Tap room specializing in Sour Beer and Ciders
Bars:
  • Motor City Wine located in Corktown.
  • SugarHouse Carefully crafted cocktails in a hunting lodge sharing a wall with Slow's. Hells yea.
  • Woodbridge Pub
  • Cafe D'Mongo's a unique and eclectic "speakeasy." reasonably priced and strong cocktails, live music every night (Fri & Sat only)
  • Cliff Bells a solid jazz club right downtown (could be under entertainment as well)
  • Dakota Inn Rathskeller a German underground beer hall that transports you straight to Europe, featuring German food, music, and beer. Especially popular during Oktoberfest (mid-September to end of October).
  • Jacoby's Biergarten good selection of draft beer, solid German food, and a huge international beer selection
  • Jolly Ol' Timers North Cass Corridor. If they're open, you won't find a bar full of more interesting people.
  • Old Miami Midtown. A Veterans bar, During the summer, the back yard is the best place to drink in the city.
  • Foran's Grand Trunk Pub Downtown; great selection of local Michigan beers, with decent food to accompany it
  • Northern Lights Lounge New Center bar with a great patio and decent food.
  • Two Way Inn One of the oldest bars in the city
  • The Skip Popular alley bar in The Belt
  • Ready Player One Barcarde
  • Checker BaOffworld Arcade Burger bar & Barcade near Campus Martius
Coffeeshops:
  • Astro Coffee a popular cafe in Corktown
  • Great Lakes Coffee Roasting Co. Chill coffee bar with beer, wine and some food.
  • Socre Tea A tea shop/cafe in midtown. Tucked away on Garfield and John R. Super quiet and relaxing.
  • Ashe Supply Co. Small-batch java drinks plus pastries, sandwiches and other goods just off Grand Circus Park in Downtown
  • Dessert Oasis Espresso, house-roasted coffee & pastries served in a brick-walled space with artwork & live music. Good window views located Downtown in Capital Park.

Landmarks

  • The Grand Lobbies of Detroit See here: http://imgur.com/a/tqC8i
  • Guardian Building another beautiful example of Art Deco architecture
  • Fisher Building "the worlds largest art project" and a prime example of Detroit's rich Art Deco history
  • The Fist of Joe Louis Woodward/Jefferson Ave
  • Ford Piquette Plant historic auto production facility and birthplace of the Model T.
  • The Spirit of Detroit Woodward/Jefferson Ave.
  • Hart Plaza Found along the Riverwalk; a public space that's home to Movement, Detroit Jazz Fest and other festivals throughout the year.
  • Senator Palmer’s Font Hill Log House and fountain in Palmer Park (when open).
submitted by sixwaystop313 to Detroit [link] [comments]

Visitor's Guide to Red Wings hockey at Joe Louis Arena

It’s the last season for Joe Louis Arena. Many pilgrims are making the trek to the Hockeytown holy ground to watch the Detroit Red Wings play. I’ve posted this guide over the years for first time visitors to the Joe. I hope you find it helpful. Suggestions welcome!
Edit 1: added a section about safety.
Edit 2: added sections on tours and inclement weather.
Edit 3: updates and clarifications.
Edit 4: updated Windsor Tunnel bus link
submitted by spoonyfork to DetroitRedWings [link] [comments]

An Essay on the Woodward Plan for Detroit, One of the Most Ambitious and Unique City Plans (x-post /r/Detroit)

Leading Picture
https://i.imgur.com/tBFvwfh.jpg
Setting the Scene:
The year is 1805. Detroit has a population of about 1000 people and has only been a part of the United States for two years. Alas, it doesn't take long for things to go horribly wrong, as the entire city burns down this year. Judge Augustus Woodward, the first Judge of the Michigan Territory, creates an ambitious and unique plan to rebuild it.
Summary of what follows:
Ultimately, for various reasons, only a small fraction of Judge Woodward's grand plan was actually implemented. My goal is to attempt to see what Detroit would be like had the Woodward plan been fully carried out, as well as educate about the details of the plan and its history.
If you're just here for the pictures, here is a link to the complete album:
https://imgur.com/a/y5hLS
If you're still with me, without further ado, let's get started.
What was Woodward's plan?
I think it is best to show it in terms of what would change about Detroit as we know it, step by step:
https://imgur.com/a/LjTL1
Key Points of the Woodward Plan
This is nuts, how much of this was actually built?
I've highlighted the buildings that exist in the city today according to the following scheme:
First, here's the buildings on top of the existing street layout:
https://imgur.com/P2uQaD3
Now, replace that street layout with Woodward's:
https://imgur.com/JRYkclz
Finally, destroy the nonconforming buildings and replace them with conforming buildings:
https://imgur.com/ZOokpeJ
This plan seems crazy, where did Woodward get the idea from?
He was impressed and inspired by Washington D.C. and its diagonal avenues, but Woodward's plan takes it a step further. While Washington D.C. is simply a system of rectangular lots that happens to have diagonal avenues in it, the Woodward plan is a modular system entirely based on triangles that could be added as the city expanded.
Are you saying the spoke roads are not a part of the Woodward Plan?
Yes, this is a common misconception. The only relationship the spoke roads have to the Woodward plan is that they take roads that are part of the Woodward plan and extend them straight for ~40 miles.
Why was so little of the plan implemented?
Firstly, Woodward had limited authority to break up land that was already owned. For example, the government owned the area between Michigan Ave and Jefferson Ave and chose to arrange it in a conventional grid. Additionally, land in parcels perpendicular to the river owned by individuals, like the Brush family and the Beaubien family, could not be broken up and incorporated into the plan.
Secondly, drafting up a city plan takes time and the people of Detroit grew restless as time passed after the devastating fire. The public also disliked the idea of so much public park space. Coupled with a general resistance for change, emnity toward Woodward's plan grew, so much so that others in Michigan's government would try to undo it while he was away. On one such occurrence, Woodward's detractors authorized the land north of Grand Circus park to be sold in rectangular parcels. Despite Woodward's alarm and protests that such a maneuver was illegal, the sale went through in 1817. This killed hope of implementing any more of the Woodward Plan. Part of Woodward's written complaint was as follows: “Nature had destined the city of Detroit to be a great interior emporium, equal, if not superior, to any other on the surface of the … globe. … In such a case that art of man should aid the benevolence of the Creator, and no restricted attachment to the present day or to present interests should induce a permanent sacrifice of ulterior and brilliant prospects.”
And with that, Detroit's chance to develop as a truly one-of-a-kind city passed. The question of "what if" has reigned unchallenged ever since. Until now, that is. Working from Judge Woodward's original plans, I built the city street by street and building by building in Sketchup, creating "Woodward Detroit". I've included some famous Detroit buildings in Woodward Detroit, most of the rest are "filler" buildings meant to give the impression of a complete city. Now, I give you Detroit built per Woodward's own specifications.
Some Aerial Photos and the Skyline
https://imgur.com/tBFvwfh https://imgur.com/Yn4TJyc https://imgur.com/sVuvYse
Transit in Woodward Detroit
I see a lot of discussion around the Detroit subreddit about Detroit's transit woes so I did some thinking about transit, both from the present Detroit perspective of auto-dominance and an alternate rail and subway perspective.
Roads
Woodward could not have foreseen the explosive growth Detroit would see, eventually growing to a city of two million. I beilieve it is remarkable that he included 120' and 200' roads when designing the city in 1805; he showed remarkable foresight there that would lend itself well to Detroit's development as Motor City. However, I believe a limitation would show itself in the circle parks. Twelve roads all come together and you're stuck in a giant traffic circle. That sounds like a traffic nighmare.
On an interesting side note, there is nothing special about Woodward Avenue in Woodward Detroit. It isn't even a grand avenue. In present Detroit after the Woodward plan was defeated, people came along afterward and extended Fort, Michigan, Grand River, Woodward, Gratiot, and Jefferson into the "spokes" we know today. Ironically, the defeat of the Woodward Plan allowed Woodward to become a household name by having his name attached to the major thoroughfare of M-1.
While I have depicted the medians in the grand avenues as solid, there is no reason they couldn't be crossed with streets as they are presently on Washington Blvd, for example.
The layout of one way streets in the small Woodward portion of present Detroit gives a clue what the layout in Woodward Detroit could be like. The circle park road is one way, like a giant roundabout, then the outer concentric circular roads are also one way in alternating directions.
https://imgur.com/1dB9WLT
Writing my own fantasy history, we'll say that the parks contributed to traffic in Woodward Detroit becoming the worst in the country by the 1950s. Citizens of Woodward Detroit unified in such an uproar at the idea running highways through their unique city that the city was forced to look at more efficient ways of moving people...
Rail / Subway
The 200' wide grand avenues leave ample room for light rail in the medians, one track each way. However, unlike in present Detroit, where roads run dozens of miles without interruption, the grand avenues of Woodward Detroit are full of parks. One possible course of action is to use the Campus Martius style parks as stations and the Circle parks as interchanges for the trains.
https://imgur.com/WDPDvAz
A second option is more familiar: spokes. These lines could be on the surface or a subway system, but I call them "the subway" in the rest of the post, so we'll go with that. I like this spoke option because it solidifies Grand Circus park as the center of the city, with subway lines stretching out to the suburbs in a similar fashion to the spoke roads today. I don't know what the Grand Circus park station would look like, with the logistics of six subway lines all intersecting there, but I'm sure the result would be a marvel of the transit world. I chose to leave it to the imagination and have them all mash together, beacuse such a station is beyond my skill to create.
https://imgur.com/lCh1UWQ
Thirdly, the "why not both?" option ensures ample transit coverage.
https://imgur.com/sd5R4Z6
Now, with all of these lines, subways, and stations, it seems we need some way to move people around between them. Hence, the People Mover takes its place in Woodward Detroit. The People Mover can finally serve its intended purpose of moving people between different transit lines.
https://imgur.com/51MRHuq
Both sets of rail and the people mover create a robust transit system.
https://imgur.com/27WzjJ9
Looking at specific famous Detroit buildings / locations
Renaissance Center Since the unique part of the Woodward plan applies to only above Jefferson Ave, the Renaissance Center can stay exactly where it is in present Detroit.
https://imgur.com/VpLTfFZ
One Detroit Center, One Woodward Ave, McKinsey, Crowne Plaza
https://imgur.com/F4G5vis
Penobscot Building, Guardian Building, 211 Fort St.
https://imgur.com/OtgdTft
Campus Martius, First National Building, One Campus Martius, One Kennedy Square The first two buildings conform to the Woodward plan, One Kennedy Square was reshaped.
https://imgur.com/lXWFtS7
Monroe Block, First National, Cadillac Tower, Cadillac Square Cadillac Square is not a square any longer; instead it is just a part of Michigan Grand Ave. I've included a concept for the upcoming development on the Monroe block.
https://imgur.com/VoGyaiV
Hudson's Site Based upon the latest renderings, though the tower of apartments is more inspired by the first rendering. Standing 800' tall to its roof, this new skycraper is a focal point for present Detroit and Woodward Detroit alike.
https://imgur.com/z6NuGkB
View from top of David Whitney Building
https://imgur.com/9D9HaWA
Book Skyscraper In my made up history, the Woodward plan allowed Detroit's boom and surge to reach even greater heights before the Depression, enabling the construction of grand plans that were shelved in present Detroit because of the Depression. One such building is the 82 Story Book skyscraper attached to the Book Tower we know and love, standing about 900' tall!
https://imgur.com/27v3W27
Grand Circus Park Grand Circus Park would be quite a sight, to be standing in the center of the full circle with all twelve lots occupied by towers (though I didn't have the heart to remove the eternal parking lot at Adams and Madison (apparently now called Aretha Franklin Way)). In this alternate history, it is the transit hub of Detroit, served by six subway lines and the People Mover.
https://imgur.com/6hCgcTL
Water Board Building
https://imgur.com/VOHe101
Detroit Library
https://imgur.com/cssXTnA
Michigan Central Station
https://imgur.com/ntN6jHM https://imgur.com/MPXMKgi
Greektown / Casino
https://imgur.com/hQICX6D
Fisher Building
Another Detroit building that was prevented from reaching its full potential by the Depression. The Fisher Building we know today is less than a third of the original plan. You can read more about that in my post here: https://www.reddit.com/Detroit/comments/5vu97d/alternate_history_the_fisher_building_is_finished/?st=j89fj0h5&sh=928a4c31
In my alternate history, the Fisher brothers, seeking to cement their legacy with the largest commercial building in the world, finally convinced the city to allow the construction of their tower inside a circle park, ensuring that it is visible as the terminating vista on 12 streets. The Albert Kahn firm spared no expense and created a lavish limestone 60 story tower flanked by two 30 story towers, crowned by gold leaf roofs and all joined together by a U shaped, three-story lobby filled with decadent gold leaf, bronze, frescos, and murals. Finished just months before the 1929 Great Depression, it stands as a nationally-recognized high point of Art Deco architecture.
https://imgur.com/Bk17fXV
(Aside: How tall is it? There is a problem with the scale of the Fisher Building model. The width is correct at 800' and the footprint actually does just barely fit inside a circle park. However, the roof height (not including spire) of the 30 story part is 301' in the model while the actual roof height is 418.3'. Applying this scale factor would put the actual height of the 60 story roof at 938.3'.)
Riverfront Towers, Cobo, Joe Louis
https://imgur.com/v0WPDBn
Comerica Park and Ford Field
I experimented to see if these stadiums could fit inside circle parks.
https://imgur.com/AtGJUJR
https://imgur.com/g1n75ZF
Views
Aerial Views and Views from the tops of buildings
https://imgur.com/QyRFaqZ https://imgur.com/UE4TfN1 https://imgur.com/LpIYRNT https://imgur.com/NtHsBd8 https://imgur.com/U6D40h0 https://imgur.com/DhQs0Yl https://imgur.com/v7V2uz4 https://imgur.com/Wf6gOjm
Matched Photo
I attempted to match an aerial photo I found https://imgur.com/N7tf2lR http://banana1015.com/files/2016/03/Spencer-Platt-Getty-Images.jpg
Bonus
Woodward Detroit's one-of-a-kind layout has created a close knit city with an atmosphere like no other, with world leading architecture, innovation, and a robust transit system. Naturally, a certain tech company looking for their second HQ chose it as their first choice, claiming "there weren't ever really any other options." I had some fun making a circle park and its surrounding buildings into one unified HQ complex. And it does lie on one of the subway lines.
https://imgur.com/3lY5Rtn
Conclusion & Sources
For further reading about the history of the Woodward plan, I recommend this excellent three part article, from which I sourced much of my information:
http://detroiturbanism.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-woodward-plan-part-i-origins.html
Some information also came from here, a shorter summary focusing on the plan's downfall:
https://www.metrotimes.com/news-hits/archives/2015/06/01/the-detroit-that-never-was-how-the-woodward-plan-died-197-years-ago
In conclusion, once I learned about Woodward and his grand plan for Detroit, I voraciously devoured any information I could find about it. The combination of its true uniqueness among urban designs and the fact that just enough of the plan was built to stimulte curiousity but not enough to indicate what the whole city would look like sent me on this path. My goal was to create what Woodward could not and provide an alternate vision for what Detroit could have been. I greatly enjoyed following Woodward's own procedure to lay out a section and then populating with all the buildings and details. I am very pleased with the final results and hope you are too. I undertook this project out of passion and interest. I hope you enjoyed reading and that I arranged the content in a clear manner. Thanks for reading!
Acknowledgements
A wonderful tool in Sketchup is the ability to import models created by others. I used this to build more of a connection from my virtual Woodward Detroit to the Detroit we know today and I feel the results of my project would not have been even half as good without them. A big thank you to the following Sketchup users:
Also thank you to this reddit post; which fueled my inspiration for this project: https://www.reddit.com/MapPorn/comments/14qgyc/oc_my_map_of_the_1807_woodward_plan_for_the/?st=j89i5z1x&sh=62676319
submitted by mr_hemi to urbanplanning [link] [comments]

A Guide to Youmacon

Hello! This is a short-ish and unbiased opinionated guide to everything Youmacon.

What:

Youmacon is a free to walk around, but pay to enter any of the rooms event loosely about Japanese culture appreciation.

When:

Youmacon is four days long around the time of Halloween Thur-Sun.

Where:

Detroit, MI Renaissance Center (Ren Cen) and Cobo Center (Cobo).

Who:

Official website Put on by paid staff, interns, and volunteers. Welcome to anyone, even kids.

Why:

• See people dressed up in costumes • Play video games, board games, and trading card games • Watch anime • Dance • Listen to music • Attend panels, talks, and discussions • Buy posters, memorabilia, figurines, stuffed critters, accessories, international snacks, games, digital media, and more
Intrigued? Here's everything I can tell you about my experiences.

Buying tickets:

Buy them online in advance! They typically go on sale around April of the same year and the sooner you buy, the better... 1. Because it's cheaper 2. You can get your ticket sooner 3. You get your ticket way, WAY faster

Which days and times to go:

It's not mandatory to attend all four days; it's a come and go as you please event. Since they only release the official schedule right before the event begins, plan on going on Sat at the very least. Try to squeeze in some time on Fri, maybe Sun. Thur is the least attended day, although everything is completely free.

What to wear:

Anything within reason! • Emulate a character from popular media (e.g., Naruto, Street Fighter, Avatar the Last Airbender, etc.) • Gender-bend your favorite character (e.g., Link, Wonder Woman, Disney, Vegeta, etc.) • Mashup characters and/or ideas (e.g., Ash Ketchum as a zombie, post-apocalyptic Mario, sexy Adventure Time, poor man's Gundam, etc.) • Out of the ordinary outfits (e.g., furry, lolita, rave cat, kimono, steam punk, etc.) • Geek attire (e.g., onesie, shirt, hat, signs, etc.)

What to bring:

Must haves...

Money! - cash only for at-the-door tickets and merchandise/food can be purchased with cash or card • ID - need it for 18+ stuff • Water bottle - you may be in long lines waiting to get into a panel, so have a water container to fill up at drinking fountains • Phone - plan out your day, take photos, communicate where you are with friends, navigate the city, and entertain yourself while waiting in line • Phone charger - preferably a power bank so you can be anywhere and still charge your phone • Bag - something to hold your stuff in and possibly some merchandise as well

Consider bringing...

Pen - you have to fill out a form when you get your ticket at the very least, so it's useful • Chapstick - give your lips some love after being out in the chilly fall air • Anti-gas meds - if you're gassy, don't damper other guests' fun • Snacks - food isn't cheap there • Energy drink - make the most of your time there and be awake for the late night events • Deodorant - freshen up a bit from time to time • Hand sanitizer - some areas have this for free, but they're not everywhere • Headphones - zone out with some music • Portable gaming system - don't forget the charger • Jacket/umbrella/rain coat - check the weather report • Comfortable clothes and shoes - you will be standing and sitting on the floor from time to time while waiting in line

Where to park:

  1. Greektown Casino - the parking garage is huge, so there's most certainly going to be a spot open, it's a stop on the People Mover, it's $10 on weekdays (you get that money back if you gamble with a player's card for 30 min), and it's free on the weekends.
  2. Cobo or Ren Cen lot - it's pricey, but you literally can't get be any closer to the action if you don't want to use the People Mover or walk, even though it's a safe area.

Getting acquainted with the people and culture:

You will NOT recognize or even like many of the outfits, but just appreciate and respect the work and thought put into them (i.e., have fun with it). There will be people there who have... interesting social norms that may differ from yours. Don't touch people without permission, even if you really want to hug your favorite character or inspect someone's intricate outfit. Be patient with other attendees as they may be quite talkative, opinionated, awkward, or not great picking up on social cues. Foster the "all are welcome" environment or at least tactfully remove yourself from uncomfortable situations and people if need be.

What to do first:

Once you have your ticket, take a look at the scheduled events and plan out your time at Youmacon. 1. Find a few panels that you would want to check out, then mark down when and where they are in your organizecalendar of choice 2. Figure out when are good times to eat (preferably outside of the busy times of around noon and 6pm) 3. Familiarize yourself with the map of the two centers and maybe the surrounding city area, especially since the Ren Cen layout is SUPER confusing 4. Go to the vendors room as early as possible to not miss out on limited quantity items 5. Walk around or play games in between panels/events If you just don't know what to do, then locate the gaming areas and take your time getting there to enjoy the costumes.

Going to a panel:

At least 30 min before a panel is going to start... 1. Head to the area where it's taking place (you will get lost at least once in the Ren Cen) 2. Go to the bathroom 3. Fill up your water bottle 4. Locate the end of the line (don't be afraid to ask which line someone is in) and don't be afraid if it's long; there's a 95% chance you'll get in and find a seat just fine 5. Keep yourself busy by talking to people in line with you if they're feeling social or do stuff on your phone (panels may not start on time, so you need to occupy your time) Panels may be quite interactive, so be prepared to sit in a spot that's near the front and by the aisles if you want to participate or away in the middle/back of the room if you just want to listen and observe.

Panel recommendations:

Totally subjective. Look through the booklet and check out anything that you might enjoy, and if you end up not liking it, you can simply leave to do something else. I personally like Raunchy Shakespeare (18+). A lot of people like the Live Action Mario and celebrity Q&A panels.

Where to eat:

The Ren Cen cafeteria on the lower level has the most selection and affordable food. Cobo has a cafeteria and some food outlets scattered about, but they're kind of over-priced. There are restaurants and bars nearby, especially around Greektown, just depends how much you want to spend, what you're craving, and how much of the sights you want to see.

What to buy:

The vendors room has a lot of stuff, but half of it is stuff you can get online for cheaper, although some offer special bulk discounts and you may be able to haggle (politely) with sellers. Look for the hand-made toys, art, trinkets, and figures. They also sell board games and trading cards in the table top areas.

Video game room:

The busiest room in all the con. If you want to play in a tournament, ask a staff person about signing up as early as possible. Many of the games are in Japanese, so just ask someone who seems to know how to use the machine when they're not busy.

Video game recommendations:

  1. Jubeat - fantastic rhythm arcade game pressing buttons to the beat that you MUST try out.
  2. Taiko no Tatsujin (Taiko Master) - another awesome rhythm arcade game using a drum.
  3. Cho Chabudai Gaeshi! (Super Table-Flip!) - a quick and silly game where you charge up your rage and flip a literal table controller destroying as much as possible.
  4. Music GunGun! - a rhythm game where you shoot targets to the beat.
  5. Any of the PC/Console games - take a break to play some familiar games, try out games you've wanted to look into, or have fun playing classics with new people

Table top room:

Test out new games or play one's you know with others. People in here can be real passionate about gaming, so be prepared for enthusiastic responses and advise if you ask questions.

Table top recommendations:

  1. Red Dragon Inn - the perfect party game that's all about fun, drinking, and gambling.
  2. Betrayal at House on the Hill - explore a haunted house and find out who amongst you is the traitor.
  3. Legendary Marvel / DC Comics Deck-Building Game - recruit your favorite super heroes to fight bad guys in card form.
  4. Alhambra - build your city one building at a time.
  5. Games in the raffle - there's an area where you can try out a new game, and then enter into a drawing to win it.
submitted by thefigg88 to Youmacon [link] [comments]

2013 Detroit Marathon

[Note: I was searching this subreddit to see if anyone had raced my upcoming marathon before, and there were no entries. Then I was surprised to find no one had done a write-up on Detroit, which is a pretty big marathon. Accordingly, here's mine; I hope runners considering Detroit will find it useful in the future!]
Getting to the starting line: Parking was pretty decent for such a large event. The maps they had at the expo helpfully pointed out a number of lots, all very close to the start. I was arriving a bit on the late side, but I still made it with plenty of time parking at one of the casinos and jogging over. Large searchlights made it pretty clear, even in the dark of night, where the race began.
The starting corrals were easy to navigate and well-marked. I entered directly at my lettered corral, but I'm pretty sure they were less "corrals" than "pretty please stand around X area."
The course itself
Segment 1: To and on the Ambassador Bridge Miles 1-4
The race starts off with a completely straight mile and a half to the entrance of the Ambassador Bridge. There's a lot of crowd support for the first half of this segment. I expected the on-ramp to the bridge to be steep and the bridge to be fairly flat; the opposite was closer to true. The on-ramps are more gentle than you might expect, and the bridge has a pretty pronounced crown at the midspan.
The bridge is fairly narrow (one lane reserved for emergency vehicles), so there's some bottlenecking. Also, if you are around the 8:00 pace, there's extra bottlenecking caused by people in the handcycle/disability division struggling up the hill. They do a good job marking these people with flags / support bikers, but you should be aware of them. They're much faster than runners everywhere else, but hills look like they're just murder on one of those things.
Lots of people like to start the marathon a bit slower for the first few miles. The course layout really helps you with that here! I, and many others, picked it up starting with the downhill segment of the bridge.
Some people might wonder about the international aspect of the race--do you really need your passport? I really carried it, but at each international crossing, I didn't see a single person who had their bib visible get stopped. Only the idiots who somehow--despite about 50 border patrol officers screaming at everyone on the course to have their bib visible--managed to cover it up got stopped, and then only to see it.
Segment 2: Canada and the Windsor Tunnel Miles 4-8
There's pretty great crowd support across the Canadian river front. There's also the five mile mark, where you hit your first timing mat of the event (the live tracking worked for my friends for every mileage except 20, where, because this was my first marathon and I had been slightly ahead of pace, they feared the worst!).
These are easy miles--nice and flat, with lots of supporters.
When I reached the tunnel, I worried a little about air quality, but it turned out to be completely fine. It was a little on the warm side, frankly, but the air was great. The elevation change in the tunnel is very subtle (it's lowest in the middle of the river). It's not quite a full mile underwater, but please no one tell the organizers: they're very excited about having an underwater mile.
Segment 3: Downtown, Mexicantown, Corktown, Greektown Miles 9-14
There's fantastic crowd support when you get back from Canada, even if your morale suffers slightly from the sudden loss of access to affordable health insurance. But the crowds fade quickly by mile 9. Miles 9 through 11 are fairly quiet, with a decent number of turns. The scenery through here is sometimes sad, with abandoned buildings dotting these neighborhoods.
Once you hit mile 12, however, you're back on Michigan Ave, and cruising toward downtown with increasing crowd support. The half-marathon runners turn off right before mile 13, but a new batch starts up--there are both "international" and "domestic" half-marathoners, so you always have fresh legs with you (although it looks like next year the domestic half will start much later, so they may not be around yet).
Segment 4: Solitude and Indian Village Miles 14-19
The run down miles 14-16 really could test your mettle. There's no one out there except the cops at the intersections (and sparsely staffed aid stations). It is a long, straight shot down a mediocre street. If you can zone out and just let the miles flow, this is the time to do it.
Miles 16 through 18 take you through "Indian Village," which is a much nicer area. There are pretty large homes on tree-lined streets, with a very pleasant atmosphere. There are a decent number of supporters out there (not crowds, but clumps of people) who are very enthusiastic. Some even offer beer! There's also a Gu station right at the beginning of this neighborhood.
The 19th mile leads you to back to the riverfront, where you get ready for...
Segment 5: Belle Isle to the Finish Miles 20-finish
The run out to Belle Isle is another mental challenge. You've finished 19 miles by the time you reach the bridge, but you can start to see other people already leaving the island. It's a bit of a gut punch, but the bridge and island themselves are beautiful. There aren't any crowds--it's an island, and the only bridge is devoted to the marathon course--but it's a pleasant atmosphere.
One of the aid stations on the island offered vaseline, which I don't think was listed on the website.
By the time you've finished mile 23, you're back across the bridge, on your way to a section of the Riverwalk. The course is a bit tight here, which is probably fine--it's not very crowded at this point. From miles 24 to the finish there's pretty strong crowd support, and the route is generally pretty straight and fast.
The one notable exception is a crime committed by the race organizers, placing the 26th mile marker at the top of a small (but at this point ENORMOUS) hill. A quick left turn and you can see the finish, but that hill is just plain mean.
Overall, I would recommend Detroit to someone running their first marathon, or any other marathon. It's a generally nice course, very well organized, and the international aspect is novel and fun.
submitted by contyg to Raceit [link] [comments]

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